Roti literally resembles the word karoti which finds its mention in the medieval Ramcharitamanas in 1600 century AD of Tulsidas. Moreover, the word Roti is similar to a Sanskrit word, rotika mentioned in a medical text Bhavaprakasa, written by Bharata-mishra in the sixteenth-century. Roti is an Indian food and is the generic Indian name for baked, grilled or roasted products. This food is regarded as one of the staple diets of the country and is mostly based on wheat flour and also derived from rice, jowar, bajra, maize.

Roti, Indian Food The Indian food, roti in its unusual kind which is made from wheat is described in Kannada literature between the tenth and eighteenth centuries. This reference has given rise to historical interest. An unusual method of roasting of these Rotis is mentioned in this Kannada text. An extensive range of methods mentioned here include Baking between plates with glowing embers both below and above and production of mucchala-roti. The kivichu-roti was roasted on a thava which is termed as kavali in Kannada with a little ghee. Several thava-roasted rotis could be consumed with sugar and edible camphor. chucchu-roti can be prepared from palmyra (thale) flowers. Other mentions of the unusual rotis contain savudu-roti baked under cover of a cup. Uduru-roti comes when a cup cover is put above with burning coals below.

Among the exotic Roti in Indian Food, mandage also comes into the list. It is delicately baked product which is white-mandige or ushnavarta-mandige and exposed to air becomes vayuputta-mandige. In this modern time mandage is made into large and fine parata stuffed with finely ground sugar containing cardamom powder which is baked on a large upturned clay pot, and folded when hot and flexible into a rectangle that hardens as it cools.

Roti as Indian Food becomes a wonderful delicacy in it bhojanandika-roti form. Wheat-based rotis in modern Indian cuisines come under three categories. These include dry-roasted on thavas comprising common chapati, rumali, slightly flattened phefras of Rajasthan, the bhatia of the same state is a popular peasant food, and do-patris are soft, thin rotis. Pan-fried rotis are prepared using a little fat, or deep-fried Paratas in a kadhai and rotis which are leavened and baked in ovens and tandoors. or a stuffing of vegetables or chopped eggs may be placed on the parata which is then folded over and lightly fried.

Indian Roti also includes Naan which is made of maida. This food is famous in the northern and western region of India including states such as Hyderabad, Amritsar and Kashmir. In addition to that this naan can be coated with a tomato and garlic paste, or with a sweet mash of dates. Apart from Naan roti, Makki di roti and rumali roti also add to the Indian dishes.

 4 cups Baking Flour
 1 ½ tsp Salt
 ½ cup Oil
 1 tbsp Butter
 Boiling Water
 1 tsp Butter (to spread over dough when mixed)

1

Add the flour, salt, oil and butter in a mixing bowl.

2

Then add a little boiling water to the mixture.

3

Mix until dough is soft (add boiling water as required).

4

Roll dough out then spread a teaspoon of butter over it.

5

Roll the dough to form a Swiss Roll.

6

Break pieces of dough and roll them into small balls.

7

Roll out each ball into a round roti using a rolling pin.

8

Fry on each side for about 30 seconds, you can add butter to one side of the roti when frying.

Ingredients

 4 cups Baking Flour
 1 ½ tsp Salt
 ½ cup Oil
 1 tbsp Butter
 Boiling Water
 1 tsp Butter (to spread over dough when mixed)

Directions

1

Add the flour, salt, oil and butter in a mixing bowl.

2

Then add a little boiling water to the mixture.

3

Mix until dough is soft (add boiling water as required).

4

Roll dough out then spread a teaspoon of butter over it.

5

Roll the dough to form a Swiss Roll.

6

Break pieces of dough and roll them into small balls.

7

Roll out each ball into a round roti using a rolling pin.

8

Fry on each side for about 30 seconds, you can add butter to one side of the roti when frying.

Roti, Chapati (Flat Indian Bread)